Every Frame a Painting

Every Frame a Painting is dedicated to the analysis of film form. Pictures and sound all the way, baby.

  • The Bad Sleep Well (1960) - The Geometry of a Scene
  • F for Fake (1973) - How to Structure a Video Essay
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    In drama, two characters walk into a room. Each wants something from the other. The question of the scene is: who gets what they want?

     

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    One overlooked aspect of Spielberg is that he’s actually a stealth master of the long take. From Duel to Tintin, for forty years, he has sneakily filmed many scenes in a single continuous shot.

     

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    A brief analysis of Bart Layton’s The Imposter (2012).

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    A brief analysis of one aspect of Bong Joon-ho’s great film Mother (2009). WARNING: MAJOR SPOILERS.

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    There are filmmakers we love and then there’s Michael Bay. Even if you dislike him (as I do), Bay has something valuable to teach us about visual perception. This is an exploration of “Bayhem” — his style of camera movement, composition and editing that creates something overblown, dynamic and distinct.

     

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    One of the many pleasures of Nicolas Winding Refn’s “Drive” (2011) is that the shots feel both tightly composed and weirdly unpredictable. Even though most of the images follow a simple quadrant system, Refn puts plenty of subtle touches within the frame. Let’s take a look.

     

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    Some filmmakers can do action. Others can do comedy. But for 40 years, the master of combining them has been Jackie Chan. Let’s see how he does it.

     

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    Characters make choices which they cannot take back. The question is: how do you show it visually? Here’s one solution from Snowpiercer. Warning: SPOILS ENTIRE FILM.